VAT ‘is a way to pay the UAE back for all it has done’

Amal Al Kuwaiti, an electrical engineer with Abu Dhabi Distribution Company, said she believes citizens and residents should give back to society in the form of the 5 per cent tax.
Engineer Amal Al Kuwaiti believes VAT harnesses the power of the consumer to needs of the nation. Ravindranath K / The National
Engineer Amal Al Kuwaiti believes VAT harnesses the power of the consumer to needs of the nation. Ravindranath K / The National

DUBAI // The VAT is a welcome opportunity to pay back the country for all it has done, a young Emirati says.

“As an Emirati, I don’t have any issue with paying this tax because it’s my turn to help my country,” said Amal Al Kuwaiti, an electrical engineer with Abu Dhabi Distribution Company.

“My country has done a lot for me and, as there is a crisis, what’s the point if I can’t pay 5 per cent back?”

The 5 per cent tax on goods and services is expected to be levied across the GCC from January next year. It will boost government revenues at a time of falling oil prices.

Ms Al Kuwaiti said she happy to pay it back to a country that has given her every opportunity.

“As Emiratis we have many opportunities,” she said. “I got a scholarship when studying for my bachelor’s and I lived a good life where I had everything I wanted, even at 19 years of age.

“Most people who have good grades can get a scholarship and if they want to go to restaurants, shops and cinemas, then they should also be willing to pay a little more for the entertainment.

“If people buy cars or expensive cosmetics, they do so because they have the money. So the tax should not hurt.”

She hoped the tax would make people more prudent about how they spent their money.

“Maybe awareness will increase and rather than spending money on anything, they will think twice about what to own and when. It will make people think wisely.”

Ms Al Kuwaiti also believes the tax will not have a major effect on expatriates.

“Maybe some people will be shocked because this is new,” she said. “They are not used to a tax and some will disagree with it.

“Others will say they came here because they were suffering from tax in their own country and ask why the UAE and GCC are doing this. But people will soon see it as a requirement of living here.”

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rtalwar@thenational.ae

Published: April 2, 2017 04:00 AM

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