Carlos Ghosn's year-long legal saga: A timeline of key events

From shocking arrest, to Nissan upheaval, a trial and escape to Lebanon, the Ghosn tale has a new twist

(FILES) This file screen grab from a handout video by representatives of former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn dated April 9, 2019 shows the 65-year-old tycoon speaking in a video message recorded before his rearrest earlier this year in Tokyo. Ghosn said on December 31, 2019 he had fled to Lebanon to escape injustice in Japan, where he was on bail awaiting trial on financial misconduct charges. The auto tycoon's abrupt departure was the latest twist in a rollercoaster journey that saw him fall from boardroom to detention centre and it sparked questions over an embarrassing security lapse in Japan. He stands accused of two counts of under-reporting his salary to the tune of 9.23 billion yen ($85 million) from 2010 to 2018, deferring some of his pay and failing to declare this to shareholders. - -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Representatives for Carlos Ghosn" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
 / AFP / Representatives for Carlos Ghosn  / Handout / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Representatives for Carlos Ghosn" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

Carlos Ghosn, 65, the automotive titan and ousted Nissan boss facing trial in Japan after charges of financial misconduct, flew to Lebanon on Monday in the latest twist to a legal wrangle that began just over a year ago.

"I am now in Lebanon and will no longer be held hostage by a rigged Japanese justice system where guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant, and basic human rights are denied," the former head of Nissan and Renault said in an emailed statement on Tuesday.

Mr Ghosn – who holds Lebanese, Brazilian and French citizenship – had been under house arrest in Japan since April and was scheduled to go on trial there in a few months. Lebanon does not have an extradition agreement with Japan.

The executive, who is accused of financial crimes such as underreporting his salary and funnelling Nissan funds for personal use, denied any wrongdoing.

The legal battle has rocked the global automotive industry, dented Nissan's profit and hurt the alliance between Nissan and its French shareholder Renault.

Here's a look at the major developments in the Ghosn story:

 
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