Saudi Arabia executes two men over terrorism offences

Pair joined terrorist cell and tracked security sites to target kingdom's forces

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - OCTOBER 05: The Saudi Arabia national flag is seen above the Saudi Arabia Consulate on October 5, 2018 in Istanbul, Turkey.  Saudi Consulate officials have said that missing writer and Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi went missing after leaving the consulate, however the statement directly contradicts other sources including Turkish officials who believe that the writer is still inside and being held by Saudi officials. Jamal Khashoggi a Saudi writer critical of the Kingdom and a contributor to the Washington Post was living in self -imposed exile in the U.S.  (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
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Saudi Arabia on Thursday executed two citizens convicted of joining a terrorist cell to target security forces, the Interior Ministry said.

The ministry identified the men as Ali bin Omar bin Mousa Al Ahmari and Ibrahim bin Ali bin Maraee Haroubi, and said they were executed in Makkah.

They were found to have joined a terrorist cell, supplied weapons and ammunition, and tracked and photographed security sites and headquarters in the kingdom with the aim of targeting them and killing security forces, it said.

The two men allegedly embraced “takfiri” thoughts, the ministry added.

Saudi authorities said one of the men, Haroubi, had been involved in making explosives designed to undermine domestic security and had planned to carry out a suicide attack to target security sites and forces.

The other man possessed an explosive belt and supported and pledged allegiance to the first man, the ministry said.

The pair had been arrested by security forces and referred to a specialised court where they were convicted and sentenced to death.

On Saturday, Saudi Arabia announced it had executed two citizens for sexual assault and murder, the Interior Ministry said. One of them was found guilty of intentionally setting an oil plant on fire and buying and possessing weapons with the aim of “carrying out attacks and tampering with security”.

Updated: March 09, 2023, 1:31 PM
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