Germany rejects Poland's claim for Second World War compensation

Poland officially renounced any claim by signing an accord in 1953, says the German government

German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock had rejected the demand during a visit to Warsaw in October, saying the issue was, for Berlin, a closed chapter. Reuters
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Germany formally rejected a Second World War reparations claim from Poland on Tuesday, estimated at €1.3 trillion ($1.4 trillion), the Polish foreign ministry said.

Poland's governing Law and Justice party has championed the issue and evoked Germany's “moral duty” since coming to power in 2015.

Last September, Poland estimated the financial cost of Second World War losses to be €1.3 trillion and sent a formal diplomatic note to Berlin demanding compensation.

Berlin has repeatedly rejected the claims, saying Poland officially renounced such demands in a 1953 accord.

“According to the German government, the issue of reparations and compensation for wartime losses remains closed and it does not intend to enter into negotiations,” the Polish foreign ministry said in a statement.

The German foreign ministry confirmed that it had “responded to a verbal note from Poland dated October 3" but did not give any details.

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German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock had rejected the demand during a visit to Warsaw in October, saying the issue was, for Berlin, a closed chapter.

The Polish foreign ministry said meanwhile that it “will further continue to seek compensation for German aggression and occupation in 1939-1945".

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Also on Tuesday, Warsaw said it had called on the UN for support in its efforts to receive war reparations.

Polish conservatives argue their country was forced to sign the 1953 accord by the Soviet Union.

Updated: January 04, 2023, 12:52 AM
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