UAE weather: mercury hits 49.8ºC with another sizzling summer day in store

Temperatures reached 49ºC in five areas of the Emirates on Monday with more hot weather on the way this week

People take cover from the sun with an umbrella on a hot day in Dubai. Chris Whiteoak / The National
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The UAE is set for another scorching summer day after temperatures approached 50ºC on Monday.

The National Centre of Meteorology said the mercury rose to 49.8C in Abu Dhabi's western region of Al Dhafra at about 3pm.

It was one of five areas in the country where temperatures reached at least 49ºC during the day.

Temperatures also approached the 50°C mark on Sunday, peaking at 49.1°C in Al Dhafra at 4.15pm, the NCM said.

Sweihan in Al Ain — which typically experiences some of the hottest weather in the country each year — is braced for another sweltering day on Tuesday, with temperatures forecast to again reach 49°C.

People there are no strangers to fierce heat, particularly during the summer.

On June 6 last year, it was officially the hottest place on Earth, as temperatures soared to 51.8°C.

The National Centre of Meteorology said some others areas of Abu Dhabi, including Razeen and Gasyoura, could also hit 49°C on Tuesday.

The high temperatures come amid an unsettled start to the summer period, which has also seen frequent rainfall.

The centre said conditions will continue to be "hot and fair to partly cloudy at times" for the remainder of week. It said convective clouds, often associated with rain, could form over eastern areas of the Emirates on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

The Northern Emirates witnessed its largest amount of rain in 30 years at the end of last month, causing flooding in which seven people died and more than 800 had to be rescued.

Al Ain has also been hit by rain in recent days.

On Sunday, heavy rain was recorded in Ajman at 4.20pm, the weather centre said.

There were further downpours in parts of Sharjah.

Updated: August 09, 2022, 5:48 AM
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