What to look out for at London Fashion Week autumn/winter 2022

While Burberry may be missing, there is still plenty to watch

A model at the Vin + Omi show on February 17, 2022. Getty Images
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Hot on the heels of New York Fashion Week, London Fashion Week opens on Friday in the British capital.

Running until February 22, it will offer a now-normal hybrid event of in-person and digital presentations, showing both men’s and women’s collections.

Noticeably missing, however, are the big hitter names of Burberry, Alexander McQueen and Victoria Beckham, who have decided not to show.

Although a shame, the absence does not necessarily spell disaster because, in the past, London Fashion Week was better known for sending blisteringly original ideas down the runway than perfectly finished seams.

With a legacy including John Galliano and Vivienne Westwood, names with a healthy disregard for rules, perhaps London is once more returning to its talent incubator roots, even if Westwood is among the brands not showing this year.

A look from Matty Bovan's spring/summer 2022 collection that reworked wallpaper patterns into outfits. Photo: Matty Bovan

Day one, for example, offers the outlandish knit specialist Matty Bovan, fashion’s newest darling for his over-the-top approach, and the beautiful subversion of Edward Crutchley. There is the London College of Fashion degree show, and a digital presentation by Stephen Jones Millinery, the man behind the headpieces at Dior.

Day two will open with the runway show of Noon By Noor, the Bahraini women’s label, and followed by Ahluwalia, the co-ed brand that is rapidly becoming a name to follow. Molly Goddard is showing, as is Richard Quinn, who will be joined by the memorably titled Banshee of Savile Row, the first Saville Row bespoke women's tailoring house to show as part of London Fashion Week.

Day three will offer the more established names of Temperley London and Simone Rocha, while day four includes the bold colouring of Roksanda, the skilled cutting of Preen by Thornton Bregazzi and the unabashed romanticism of Erdem.

Updated: October 13, 2022, 10:28 AM
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