Sabyasachi announces second collaboration with Bergdorf Goodman

American fans of the Indian label can expect the new collection on February 18

The Indian label Sabyasachi is launching a second collaboration with New York City store Bergdorf Goodman. Courtesy Sabyasachi
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Indian fashion label Sabyasachi has just announced it is teaming up with the New York store Bergdorf Goodman for the second time.

This follows the success of the launch early last year of an exclusive array of 65 piece, one-of-a-kind high jewellery collection for the store, that despite the pandemic, still managed sales to the tune of $2.5million.

Now, for round two, the designer, full name Sabyasachi Mukherjee, is bringing a new collection of 250 pieces featuring his trademark prints and colours, across a range of ready-to-wearready to wear, scarves, shawls, fine jewellery and even a new line of bags.There will also be a bridal couture collection.

Sabyasachi will launch a new collection for Bergdorf Goodman, including bags. Courtesy Sabyasachi

Known primarily for mixing traditional handcraft elements such a block printing, hand embroidery and leather coloured by hand with a contemporary aesthetic, Sabayasachi has amassed a devoted clientele since founding his brand in 1999 in Kolkata.

In a sign of the high hopes Bergdorf Goodman holds for the brand, the latest collaboration will be situated alongside Christian Dior in the Fifth Avenue store.  Speaking with Vogue India, Mukherjee was quick to praise the company for including non-western names in its stable, saying, "By selling Indian clothes, Bergdorf is rasing the bar on inclusivity."

In addition, Mukherjee has also announced the long awaited-opening date for his first New York flagship.

When the plan was announced early in 2020, it was originally scheduled to open this year. However, the pandemic has pushed that date now to early 2022.

When it does finally open its doors however, customers can expect 6,000 square feet brimming with charming prints and patterns across a wide mix of both western and Indian styles, including saris and kurtas.

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