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Scotland says no: reaction from politicians, business leaders and analysts

Scottish voters have rejected independence from the rest of the United Kingdom in a vote that had threatened to break up the world’s sixth-biggest economy. Here is comments from politicians, business leaders and analysts to the result of the referendum.
Pro-union supporters react as Scottish independence referendum results come in at a Better Together event in Glasgow. Scottish voters decided to say in the United Kingdom. Amndy Buchanan / AFP Photo
Pro-union supporters react as Scottish independence referendum results come in at a Better Together event in Glasgow. Scottish voters decided to say in the United Kingdom. Amndy Buchanan / AFP Photo

Below are comments from politicians, business leaders and analysts to the result of the referendum.

UK prime minister David Cameron

“I’ve just spoken to Alex Salmond, congratulating him on a hard-fought campaign. I’m delighted the SNP will join talks on further devolution.”

“Now it is time for our United Kingdom to come together and move forward.”

“The debate has been settled for a generation ... there can be no disputes, no reruns. We have heard the settled will of the Scottish people.”

Scotland’s first minister and SNP leader Alex Salmond

“Scotland has by a majority decided not, at this stage, to become an independent country. I accept that verdict of the people and I call on all of Scotland to follow suit in accepting the democratic verdict of the people of Scotland.”

On the promises by Britain’s main political parties to devolve more powers to Scotland: “Scotland will expect these to be honoured in rapid course.”

Alistair Darling MP, leader of the ‘No’ campaign and former chancellor of the exchequer

“We have chosen unity over division, and positive change rather than needless separation.”

“Every political party must now listen to [the public’s] cry for change which could be echoed in every part of our United Kingdom but had the opportunity to express itself first in Scotland.”

John Longworth, head of the British chamber of commerce

“The companies I speak to are clear that this cannot simply be the first in a series of referenda, until one side or the other gets the result that it wants. Business and investment prospects across the UK would be deeply hurt by a Quebec-style ‘neverendum’ — a lesson that politicians must heed.”

Michael Saunders, Economist with Citigroup

“Although the election is a clear win for the ‘No’ vote, support for independence is roughly 10 per cent higher than polls indicated six months ago, and is sufficiently high that the referendum is likely to be followed by a ‘neverendum’ scenario — in which there are continuing calls for a further referendum in coming years.”

* Reuters

Published: September 19, 2014 04:00 AM

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