Putin holidays in remote Russian wilderness fishing spot of Amur Oblast

Russian president was pictured hiking in Amur Oblast, Siberia

Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for enjoying his staycations and has been seen riding horseback, trekking and taking snowmobile rides.

Over the weekend, pictures of Mr Putin, 68, showed him fishing and hiking in the remote wilderness of Amur Oblast, Siberia.

As well as standing in a river to catch fish, he was seen walking through lush meadows and talking to Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu, his usual holiday companion.

A caption under one of the 20 pictures published on the Kremlin website said the president stopped for a few days in Siberia after a working trip to Russia's Far East in early September.

Mr Putin went on the trip around the time he was due to go into self-isolation after members of his Cabinet caught Covid-19.

The Russian leader has had two shots of the country's Sputnik V vaccine and the Kremlin said he was feeling healthy.

Located in Russia’s far east, Amur is one of the most remote inhabited parts of Russia. Accessible by two railways, the Trans-Siberian express and the Baikal-Amur mainline, the Oblast – or Russian province – has a population of less than 1 million, despite being roughly the size of Japan, covering 360,000 square kilometres.

Without taking the train, Mr Putin and Mr Shoigu could have taken an eight hour flight from Moscow to Amur's Khurba airport, followed by hours of driving or a short helicopter ride to get to their nature-filled retreat.

While Mr Putin's protection detail have little to worry from foreign threats during his break, Amur is home to the Amur tiger, one of the most endangered – and dangerous – mammals on the planet, as well as the Ussuri brown bear, a vegetarian animal that is known to have killed humans.

Mr Putin's cultivated macho image appeals to many Russians and he has previously been pictured riding a horse bare-chested and in sunglasses, as well as carrying a hunting rifle and piloting a fighter jet.

Updated: September 28th 2021, 8:56 AM
EDITOR'S PICKS
NEWSLETTERS