Almost 100 marine species discovered off coast of Abu Dhabi nuclear energy plant

The Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nawah Energy company said that more than 63 marine species were found utilising the breakwater habitats and 35 were found in the artificial reef habitat created by ENEC and Nawah in 2014.
A study by the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (Enec) and Nawah Energy Company’s (Nawah) has shown the presence of more than 60 marine species as a result of the artificial reef created off the coast of the Barakah nuclear energy plant in 2014. Courtesy Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation
A study by the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (Enec) and Nawah Energy Company’s (Nawah) has shown the presence of more than 60 marine species as a result of the artificial reef created off the coast of the Barakah nuclear energy plant in 2014. Courtesy Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation

ABU DHABI // More than 60 marine species were found in the breakwater and artificial reef habitats off the coast of the Barakah nuclear energy plant.

The Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nawah Energy Company said more than 63 marine species were found on the breakwater habitats and 35 were found in the artificial reef built by ENEC and Nawah in 2014.

Marine organisms in the breakwaters included a variety of species of algae, invertebrate species, species of fish and one species of marine mammals.

“The findings of this recently conducted survey reveal that ENEC’s proactive approach to conservation and sustainability is having a positive impact,” said Mohamed Al Hammadi, chief executive of ENEC. “It is wonderful to hear that a variety of marine life, including endangered species, have been able to settle in the waters around Barakah.

“ENEC works closely with EAD to regularly monitor and effectively mitigate any impact the programme may have on the surrounding environment.”

A restriction on marine activities, particularly fishing, has provided a favourable habitat for species, such as the orange-spotted grouper, locally known as hamour, the near-threatened Indian Ocean humpback dolphin, and the critically endangered hawksbill turtle.

“We are making every effort to make sure that we promote clean and efficient energy inside our organisation and out,” said Mohammed Sahoo Al Suwaidi, chief executive of Nawah. “We have a responsibility to protect our environment and the world we live in. This way we can continue to develop and improve the quality of life for future generations of our nation.”

dmoukhallati@thenational.ae

*This article has been amended to correct an error due to incorrect information supplied.

Published: September 6, 2016 04:00 AM

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