Professional help needed in music

A reader urges Emiratis to follow the example of the likes of Hamad Al Taee, the self-taught pianist, who is also a cadet pilot in training and was the first volunteer with Abu Dhabi Police. Lee Hoagland/The National
A reader urges Emiratis to follow the example of the likes of Hamad Al Taee, the self-taught pianist, who is also a cadet pilot in training and was the first volunteer with Abu Dhabi Police. Lee Hoagland/The National

Hala Khalaf’s report on the self-taught pianist Hamad Al Taee, who is also a cadet pilot in training, was interesting (Playing from the heart, December 2). However, I would like to point out that there are no shortcuts to learning music. If you don’t take lessons from professionals, you are likely to develop bad habits that will take years to undo and hinder progress. I am an Emirati musician, playing both cello and piano. For me it took years of sweat and tears to learn good technique. That said, I congratulate Al Taee for his effort and passion.

Elham Al Marzouqi, Abu Dhabi

People like Al Taee are those whom young Emiratis should look up to. I congratulate him.

Taher Afridi, Dubai

Women have the power to bridge gender divide

Rana Askoul’s opinion article The gender gap is evident ... even in pregnancy (December 3) shows how important it is to empower women. They must be aware of their situation and help themselves to achieve equal rights.

Chithra Unni, Abu Dhabi

It’s unfortunate that this phenomenon still persists. Education is the key to awareness and empowerment.

Shiuli Lara Dutt, Dubai

Cycle theft spoilt celebrations

My nine-year-old daughter broke down in tears when thieves decided they needed her bicycle more than she did. She rode to Abu Dhabi Heritage Village near Marina Mall with her grandmother and mother to celebrate National Day and see the fireworks, when she was told by security that she could not take her bike inside the village.

He instructed her to leave the bike at the gate and said he would watch over it. When she returned to the gate to collect it, it had been stolen. We searched everywhere and reported the theft to the Heritage Village administration and security.

We also told the police who were nearby and they offered to ring me if they saw anyone riding it. I was shocked that someone would take her bike, especially on such a great day.

Tracy Wilson, Abu Dhabi

India can utilise ISIL suspect

The case of the Indian student Areeb Majid who got disillusioned with ISIL and returned to his hometown in Mumbai is both disturbing and interesting (Indian student quits ISIL after being made to clean toilets, December 2). It’s disturbing because it shows that educated Indian youths are now getting attracted to the terrorist group. It’s also interesting as it shows how some of these people are getting disillusioned after confronting the reality. He went to fight, but ended up doing menial work. He was even neglected by his fellow men when he was injured.

I think the government should utilise these men as a tool to dissuade others by making them share their experiences with the vulnerable community.

Name withheld by request

Is Erdogan’s remark sensible?

Putting aside the sensational headline and any prejudices, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s comment does make sense (Erdogan: Women not equal to men, November 25).

There are inherent physiological differences between the genders, which means each has certain niche functions best suited to itself. Whether he was wrong to slam feminism, a movement founded on achieving social gender equality, is a different matter.

The president did not offer motherhood as the universal purpose for women. He was only trying to explain that certain life activities are exclusive to and more conveniently dealt with by each gender.

Rusiru Thathsara Ekanayaka, Dubai

Biologically, men and women have different roles, and to some extent in society as well. However, that does not mean that women should not share the same rights and opportunities as men.

What really bugs me is that someone with such backward ideas is in power. Isn’t the point of a leader to lead the people, all people?

Theo Scheepers, Abu Dhabi

Published: December 3, 2014 04:00 AM

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