Sudan protesters face tear gas at International Women's Day rally

'Women's demands are the revolution's demands' read one banner

Beta V.1.0 - Powered by automated translation

Protesters in Sudan marching on International Women's Day faced tear gas as they approached the presidential palace on Tuesday, Reuters reported.

Women's rights groups protested alongside demonstrations against military rule, which have taken place since Sudan's military took power in October.

"Women's demands are the revolution's demands," read one banner.

After the rally reached the presidential palace in the capital Khartoum, security forces chased protesters into nearby streets.

The coup put an end to a power-sharing arrangement between civilians and the military. It was struck after former president Omar Al Bashir was toppled in a 2019 uprising in which women played a prominent role.

The protest comes as Sudan faces economic free-fall. On Tuesday, the Sudanese pound was devalued by about 19 per cent after its price slid on the black market.

The coup has also resulted in the reversal of decisions made since Mr Bashir's fall, and a crackdown in which political figures have been arrested and dozens of protesters killed.

On Tuesday, politician Babiker Faisal became the latest prominent former member of a committee tasked with dismantling Bashir's regime to be detained, his party said.

In recent weeks, courts have reversed the committee's firings of dozens of bureaucrats in the central bank, foreign ministry and other entities.

Sudan's ruling council said on Monday that holds placed on some accounts by the committee would be lifted, while other decisions affecting more than 1,500 individuals and companies would be upheld while under review.

In a further sign of rolling back work done under the power-sharing government, the head of a committee investigating the lethal dispersal of a sit-in in June 2019 said he had suspended its work after security forces took over its offices.

Updated: March 09, 2022, 6:21 AM
EDITOR'S PICKS
NEWSLETTERS
MORE FROM THE NATIONAL