'Making maeloubah': Dua Lipa has been cooking Palestinian food from self-isolation

She got the recipe from boyfriend Anwar Hadid's father, Mohamed Hadid

As people spend more time at home, many around the world have been trying new recipes and sharing them on Instagram – and Dua Lipa is no exception.

The New Rules singer has tried her hand at a Palestinian dish, maeloubah, also known as makloubeh. The recipe was shared by Mohamed Hadid, the father of her model boyfriend, Anwar Hadid.

"I haven't been counting ... but day 28471629 and we have a massive chocolate cake with two small spoons, a new mani every third day, making Palestinian maeloubah (thank you Mohamed Hadid for the recipe!)," the 24-year-old singer wrote on Instagram of the ways she has been keeping busy.

She added that the next day's leftovers of the maeloubah "were even better".

Mohamed Hadid is a Jordanian-American real estate developer. He was born in Nazareth, Palestine, in 1948 and moved to the US aged 14.

Two days ago, he shared his maeloubah recipe on Instagram, so we can all give it a try. He explained that the name of the dish, which features lamb shoulder, spiced rice and yoghurt salad, means "upside down".

DJ Khaled, who also has Palestinian heritage, commented on the post saying that it was his favourite.

Lipa also listed the movies that she and Anwar Hadid have been watching, including Syrian film For Sama, which was nominated for Best Documentary Feature at the 2020 Academy Awards.

The rest of the list included No Country For Old Men, Avatar, The Big Lebowski and Howls Moving Castle. 

She wrote: "Need some recommendations so please tell me what you’re watching so I can add to the list."

In February this year, Anwar Hadid's sister, Gigi Hadid, spoke about her favourite Palestinian food on Twitter.

In an #askGigi Q&A, the part-Palestinian model said that kibbeh with labneh and tabbouleh is a go-to of hers. She also added that she loves eggs with zaatar for breakfast.

After Hadid, 24, posted about her favourite dishes she seemed to be inundated with comments questioning the origins of her choices, with many telling her that what she was describing was Lebanese cuisine.

"To everyone saying all of these foods are Lebanese only, my dad was born in Palestine in ‘48, where his family lived for many generations before that and ate these foods their entire lives," she said. "Before borders and ownership of land, the region’s dishes and ingredients were always the same".

She continued: "I should also add that my family and I support many family owned Lebanese restaurants to enjoy the food we all love."