Album review: The Charlatans get nostalgic in Different Days

The Charlatans have had repeated cycles of rises and falls in their nearly 30-year career, and the swirling Different Days is a reminder of the good times.

Different Days, the latest album by The Charlatans
Powered by automated translation

Different Days

The Charlatans

(BMG)

Three stars

There are two parts to The Charlatans' 13th album Different Days – the first with sunny melodies – and the other which samples their roots in Manchester's baggy-dance scene.

Opener Hey Sunrise leads with acoustic guitars and has a melancholy air like The Church's Under the Milky Way.

A melody that practically floats appears on Solutions, with Tim Burgess stretching the syllables.

Not Forgotten kicks off imaginary part two, which sees the band setting their phasers to nostalgia and performing as if back in 1990 again, sharing a Madchester stage with The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays.

There Will Be Chances sounds like Stephen Duffy's early rock creation Tin Tin, while The Same House reminds of 1991 sensations The Farm.

Paul Weller puts his stamp on Spinning Out – co-writing the track while also contributing backing vocals, percussion and keyboards.

The Charlatans have had repeated cycles of rises and falls in their nearly 30-year career, and the swirling Different Days is a reminder of the good times.

* Pablo Gorondi / Associated Press