Donald Trump's ‘I won the election’ Twitter message sparks tweetstorm

The tweet came a week after Democrat Joe Biden was officially declared the winner of the election

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Cecil Airport in Jacksonville, Florida, U.S., September 24, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner/File Photo     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      SEARCH "GLOBAL POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2020 PACKAGES.

US President Donald Trump’s all-cap declaration that he had won the election drew unusual reactions from social media users who came up with their own version of the tweet this week.

The tweet came a week after Democratic candidate Joe Biden was officially declared the winner of the nationwide election.

Mr Trump’s declaration was quickly flagged by Twitter, which tagged the tweet: "Official sources called this election differently."

The missive instantly became a meme that users turned into a reflection of their own experiences. It was used by celebrities, international brands and social media users who mocked the president for repeatedly refusing to concede the election.

Many screenshot the tweet to fix it by changing Twitter’s fact check, while others quoted the tweet to make bizarre claims.

Users shared their dreams and wishes hoping it could turn into a reality. Author Bari A Williams wrote: “I am Beyonce.”

Congress leader Saral Patel said he was the Duke of Cambridge.

Several Twitter users declared that they, too, had won the election.

The Indian food delivery platform, Swiggy, mocked Mr Trump’s tweet by declaring vegetarian biryani as the national food of India.

For several months Mr Trump claimed allegations of fraud for the elections in an attempt to undermine the results.

He pledged to press on with a legal strategy that he hopes will overturn the outcome.

“He only won in the eyes of the FAKE NEWS MEDIA,” Mr Trump tweeted. “I concede NOTHING! We have a long way to go. This was a RIGGED ELECTION!”

President-elect Joe Biden won the popular vote, by 5.5 million, and 306 electoral college votes, 36 more than the 270 needed to win the White House and 74 more than Mr Trump.

But it appears that it will not, and has not, stopped Mr Trump from falsely claiming otherwise.

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