Prison fire-starter jailed for an extra three months



DUBAI // An inmate in solitary confinement who set fire to his pillow was today sentenced to an extra three months in jail.

AT, a 47-year-old Emirati, was also ordered by the Criminal Court to pay the police Dh100 to cover the cost of the damages he caused - including the Dh15 pillow.

He set fire to the pillow on April 23 this year hoping it would force guards to let him out of his solitary confinement cell.

In a previous hearing he denied starting the fire.

"Where is the pillow they claim I set fire to? I was beaten," he told the judge. However, when the judge asked who had beaten him, he replied "Ask the government," before demanding more time to prepare his defence and threatening to leave the courtroom.

When the judge announced a verdict would be issued on July 31, he said: "God curse your father - and the prosecution's."

The inmate was found guilty of setting fire to an inhabited place and posing a risk to the lives of others. In a separate case he was found guilty of similar charges relating to a different incident in which he set fire to an Dh85 blanket in his cell, for which he also received a three-month jail term.

His original offence and sentence were not disclosed.

salamir@thenational.ae

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Law 41.9.4 of men’s T20I playing conditions

The fielding side shall be ready to start each over within 60 seconds of the previous over being completed.
An electronic clock will be displayed at the ground that counts down seconds from 60 to zero.
The clock is not required or, if already started, can be cancelled if:
• A new batter comes to the wicket between overs.
• An official drinks interval has been called.
• The umpires have approved the on field treatment of an injury to a batter or fielder.
• The time lost is for any circumstances beyond the control of the fielding side.
• The third umpire starts the clock either when the ball has become dead at the end of the previous over, or a review has been completed.
• The team gets two warnings if they are not ready to start overs after the clock reaches zero.
• On the third and any subsequent occasion in an innings, the bowler’s end umpire awards five runs.

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Round 2: Beat Naomi Osaka 7-6, 1-6, 7-5
Round 3: Beat Marie Bouzkova 6-4, 6-2
Round 4: Beat Anastasia Potapova 6-0, 6-0
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if you go

The flights

Direct flights from the UAE to the Nepalese capital, Kathmandu, are available with Air Arabia, (www.airarabia.com) Fly Dubai (www.flydubai.com) or Etihad (www.etihad.com) from Dh1,200 return including taxes. The trek described here started from Jomson, but there are many other start and end point variations depending on how you tailor your trek. To get to Jomson from Kathmandu you must first fly to the lake-side resort town of Pokhara with either Buddha Air (www.buddhaair.com) or Yeti Airlines (www.yetiairlines.com). Both charge around US$240 (Dh880) return. From Pokhara there are early morning flights to Jomson with Yeti Airlines or Simrik Airlines (www.simrikairlines.com) for around US$220 (Dh800) return. 

The trek

Restricted area permits (US$500 per person) are required for trekking in the Upper Mustang area. The challenging Meso Kanto pass between Tilcho Lake and Jomson should not be attempted by those without a lot of mountain experience and a good support team. An excellent trekking company with good knowledge of Upper Mustang, the Annaurpuna Circuit and Tilcho Lake area and who can help organise a version of the trek described here is the Nepal-UK run Snow Cat Travel (www.snowcattravel.com). Prices vary widely depending on accommodation types and the level of assistance required. 


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