Dressed to fly?

A survey reveals that many air travellers get upset about what other passengers wear

If you think that nobody cares what you wear at the airport or on a plane, you’re mistaken. Screengrab from Mad Men.
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The clientele at airline terminals and bus stations are increasingly looking similar these days, with passengers wearing all sorts of things – sweatpants, shorts, flip-flops and socks with sandals. Clearly the days of wearing suits, hats and gloves while travelling are over.

But if you think that nobody cares what you wear at the airport or on a plane, you’re mistaken. In a survey of more than 2,000 air travellers by the website airfarewatchdog.com, 59 per cent of respondents agreed that airlines should have the right to refuse passengers on board if they are dressed inappropriately.

Some airlines don’t allow clothing that displays offensive language or symbols, which is fair enough. But, as long as our clothes remain within the bounds of decency, do we need to be told by our fellow passengers how to dress? Isn’t comfort the main issue on a long flight? After all, in first and business class, many airlines are providing passengers with pyjamas.