Bombay Bicycle Club: A Different Kind of Fix

The album is lushly textured with intertwining rhythms and some infectiously offbeat instrumentation.

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A Different Kind of Fix
Universal/Island
***

Since they first emerged in 2009, north London's Bombay Bicycle Club have not been shy in keeping listeners on their toes, with each album representing a radical departure from the last. Their debut I Had the Blues but I Shook Them Loose was an inspired effort, recalling all the zany musical ideas and passion of Bloc Party.

The follow-up, however, probably much to the dismay of their record company, saw them ditch their indie stylings and release the straight-out acoustic album Flaws. The album's straight-to-the-heart songwriting endeared them to fans who were as excited as weary of the band's eclectic muse. So when the group announced they would release the third album A Different Kind of Fix, it wouldn't have been surprising if it ended being a musical exploration of Russian Polka.

Thankfully, the quartet don't keep it too left-field with their latest effort. It is another significant step towards new musical territory with electronica being the dominant flavour. Opening with the swooning How Can You Swallow So Much Sleep, the album is lushly textured with intertwining rhythms and some infectiously offbeat instrumentation.

The single Shuffle begins from wonky piano and builds up to a glorious crescendo with Jack Steadman's quivering vocals hovering above. Your Eyes is more direct, with the guitars content to lock on a steady groove, and Leave It recalls the melodic sweep of Mercury Rev.

However, a few half-baked offerings, such as Beggars and Favourite Day, slow down the album somewhat; worthy misfires for a band not scared of exploring new ground with every turn.