You may be set for a longer wait to break your fast at Burj Khalifa, says top scientist

The sun appears to set later the higher you go up the world's tallest tower, according to the famous astrophysicist, Neil deGrasse Tyson

View Of the Burj Dubai on the day of its opening.

Jeff Topping / The National 
EDITORS NOTE: Building was opened at 8pm on January 4th, 2010 at which point the name changed from Burj Dubai to Burj Khalifa. Official name is now Burj Khalifa *** Local Caption ***  TEST 2_MG_9647.jpg
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If you are lucky enough to eat iftar at a restaurant in Burj Khalifa this Ramadan, you may have to be extra patient in breaking your fast – and it has nothing to do with the speed of the service.

That is because the sun appears to set later the higher you go up the world's tallest tower, according to the famous astrophysicist, Neil deGrasse Tyson.

And at levels 154 and 122, The Lounge, the world’s tallest lounge, and At.mosphere, the highest restaurant, are both a very long way up.

“During Ramadan, daytime fasting for Muslims ends at sunset,” wrote Mr Tyson on Twitter.

“But for Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, the Sun sets four minutes later at the top than at the bottom. High-floor dwellers see beyond the ground-level horizon, farther along Earth’s curvature.”

Ramadan is expected to be called on Sunday evening, making Monday, May 6 the first day of the holy month.

It is the ninth month of the Islamic, or Hijri calendar, and the holiest month for Muslims, who believe it is when the Quran was revealed to the Prophet Mohammed.

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