Extra fuel use link to obesity

One billion gallons of extra fuel was used in America to compensate for the added weight of drivers and passengers from 1960 to 2002, according to a study.

USA // One billion gallons of extra fuel was used in America to compensate for the added weight of drivers and passengers from 1960 to 2002, according to a study. The figure was revealed in a report on obesity by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "If you look at it another way, 0.7 percent of all the fuel burned in vehicles from 1960 to 2002 has been attributable to passengers who have packed on a few extra pounds," reported Autoblog Green web site. "Or, how about this one: 39 million gallons of fuel are burned for each pound gained by the average American." Obesity is still on the rise in the US, according to the CDC report, which states that "the number of states with an obesity prevalence of 30 per cent or more has tripled in two years to nine states in 2009." The trend has seen a move by drivers to buy bigger cars, therefore increasing fuel consumption. The report states that 72 million Americans are obese, meaning 26.7 per cent of the country has a body mass index of over 30. But some critics believe the CDC report underestimating and the figure is closer to 34 per cent as the CDC report is based on self-reporting.