Four Oath Keepers convicted of seditious conspiracy for January 6 roles

Conviction is latest victory for US Justice Department as it prosecutes those who tried to block certification of 2020 presidential election

Members of Oath Keepers stand in front of the US Capitol on January 6, 2021. AP
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Four members of the far-right group Oath Keepers were convicted of seditious conspiracy on Monday, delivering another victory for the US Justice Department as it aims to prosecute those involved in the January 6 insurrection.

The convictions of David Moerschel, Joseph Hackett, Roberto Minuta and Edward Vallejo come about two months after Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes was convicted of seditious conspiracy.

Seditious conspiracy is a law prohibiting people from attempting to overthrow the US government. It carries a maximum sentence of 20 years.

Three other members of the group were found not guilty of the charge during Rhodes's trial, though they were convicted of obstructing Congress from certifying an election.

The convicted Oath Keepers members and other supporters of former president Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol in 2021 in an attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

More than 950 people have been charged since the attack.

Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio and other members of the far-right group are currently on trial facing similar conspiracy charges.

A separate jury earlier on Monday convicted the man who was photographed propping his feet on then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's desk during the 2021 attack.

Richard “Bigo” Barnett was convicted of obstructing Congress's certification of the election, illegally entering the Capitol and disorderly conduct with a dangerous weapon.

Richard Barnett is seen propping his feet on the desk of Nancy Pelosi inside the Capitol on January 6, 2021. AFP

After the attack, Barnett was quoted by the media as saying: “I put a quarter on her desk even though she ain’t [expletive] worth it. And I left her a note on her desk that says, 'Nancy, Bigo was here, you [expletive].'”

Obstruction of an official proceeding carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

Agencies contributed to this report

Updated: January 23, 2023, 9:17 PM
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