My team: 13 years of missed opportunites for Sarries

Francois Pienaar, Tim Horan, Michael Lynagh, Thomas Castaignede, Philippe Sella, Kyran Bracken and Taine Randell reads like a who's who of world rugby.

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Francois Pienaar, Tim Horan, Michael Lynagh, Thomas Castaignede, Philippe Sella, Kyran Bracken and Taine Randell reads like a who's who of world rugby. Throw in Richard Hill, the back-row warrior who is the most unsung member of England's World Cup-winning squad in 2003, and the list also doubles up as collection of the rugby union alumni who have graced the red and black of Saracens, the great underachievers in the Guinness Premiership.

Yet for all the luminaries who have been lured, and reared, at the club, all they have to show for the last 13 years of professional rugby is one trophy, secured in 1998. In fact it was that long ago that the domestic cup competition has changed its name twice and now includes teams from Wales to make it more competitive. The only thing that has been gathering in the club's trophy cabinet since is dust. Nigel Wray, the business tycoon worth a reported £150m (Dh803m), has bankrolled the dream but, so far, has failed to transfer his acumen in business into the boardroom of the club.

Wray has a penchant for going through coaches like some people go through socks (Brendan Venter, the incoming head coach, will be their seventh in as many years). Eschewing a similar revolving door policy on players, this has done little to promote stability but it has made for compelling viewing since they transferred their base from north London to Hertfordshire in 1997 to embrace the professional era - a move that transported the club on to my doorstep.

They have veered from intoxicating to insipid at times but my support for them never seems to wane because one day, just maybe, you suspect they might just get it right.