Imdaad happy to waste its time on such a tall order

Imdaad, the facilities management company, has won a three-year contract to manage the domestic waste produced by the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building.

It's a dirty job, but somebody's got to do it. Imdaad, the facilities management company, has won a three-year contract to manage the domestic waste produced by the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building. Imdaad, which is owned by Dubai World, will be responsible for managing and recycling the waste that amasses every day in the hotels, restaurants and offices throughout the 828-metre tower.

They will also be responsible for taking away the rubbish from 1,044 residential apartments within the 162 stories of the Burj, about as much housing as can be found in a small town. Jamal Lootah, the chief executive of Imdaad, said: "Delivering waste management solutions to one of the world's most prestigious buildings is something we look forward to with great enthusiasm." The deal comes in a period of upheaval and uncertainty for maintenance companies, with a new strata law coming into effect in October that will allow owners to appoint their own management companies for the first time.

Imdaad, one of the largest facilities management companies in the UAE, claims to be the only such company that can perform all levels of waste management in-house without relying on external contractors. The company said one of its key tasks would be meeting sustainability requirements to cut the carbon footprint of the huge tower. Dubai is particularly keen on boosting its green credentials following years of frenzied construction, making a point of including environmental sustainability as a key goal of the Dubai Strategic Plan 2015.

Among the Burj Khalifa's waste management features is a water system that recycles condensation from outside the tower to regulate the temperature of its concrete. This is used to irrigate botanical gardens, a series of man-made lakes and the world's largest indoor fountain, all designed to be as environmentally friendly as possible. The tower's water system uses an average of almost 1 million litres of water a day.

gregor.hunter@thenational.ae

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