Time names sexual abuse 'Silence Breakers' as Person of the Year

The group revealed the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and assault across various industries that triggered a national reckoning in the United States

This image obtained December 6, 2017 courtesy of Time magazine, shows the 2017 Time Person of the Year: "The Silence Breakers".
Time magazine named December 6, 2017, "The Silence Breakers" who revealed the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and assault across various industries that triggered a national reckoning in the United States as Person of the Year."The Silence Breakers" designates a broad range of people, mostly women, from this year's first public accusers of disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein to those who shared their stories of abuse using the hashtag #MeToo and its foreign language equivalents. The cover features a group portrait of “The Silence Breakers,” including Ashley Judd, Susan Fowler, Adama Iwu, Taylor Swift, and Isabel 
 / AFP PHOTO / TIME Inc. / Billy & Hells / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / TIME INC./BILLY & HELLS/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

While it was Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman who won the Time readers' poll, the magazine announced 'The Silence Breakers' as their pick for 2017 Person of the Year on Wednesday.

The group revealed the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and assault across various industries that triggered a national reckoning in the United States.

The decision comes from the TIME editors who base their selection on a person or group of people who most influenced the news during the past year for better or worse.

"This is the fastest moving social change we've seen in decades, and it began with individual acts of courage by hundreds of women - and some men, too - who came forward to tell their own stories," TIME editor-in-chief Edward Felsenthal told NBC's Today programme.

Crown Prince Mohammed won the poll with 24 per cent of votes and made headlines this year when he launched an anti-corruption campaign that led to the arrest of more than 300 people, including princes, former and current ministers and billionaire businessmen.

He has also been lauded for his efforts in reforming Saudi Arabia's political and economic landscape and for leading the Saudi Vision 2030.

The most important changes in the kingdom included the decision to allow women to drive in 2018, plans to sell a stake in national oil giant Aramco, and restricting the powers of the religious police.

Also shortlisted were US president Donald Trump, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, China’s president Xi Jinpig, and US special counsel Robert Mueller.

________________________
Read more:

________________________

EDITOR'S PICKS
NEWSLETTERS