Yemen swears in new government and plans end to Saudi Arabia exile

The new Cabinet will be relocating from Riyadh to Aden within the next 10 days

Yemen's new government was sworn in before President Abdrabu Mansur Hadi on Saturday in exile in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh because of the ongoing civil war.

The new Cabinet was formed on December 18 in line with the political annex of the Riyadh Agreement, which was brokered by Saudi Arabia between the Yemen government and the Southern Transitional Council separatists in 2019.

The new government is divided between South Yemen and North Yemen and includes five pro-STC ministers.

Salem Al Awlaki of the STC said the formation of the new government was one of the most important and challenging parts of the Riyadh Agreement, and that Saturday's signing was a major breakthough towards ending the country's five-year war.

“We wish all success for the new government, which must return to Aden as soon as possible to be close to the people,” Mr Al Awlaki said.

“There is no reason for the new government to stay on exile any more because the long standoff has come to end, but the government must keep away from political agendas to avoid the fate of the previous governments."

According to the state-run Saba news agency, Mr Hadi spoke to the new government and directed them to work collaboratively.

“We want you to rebuild state institutions and to work hard to revive the deteriorated economy and stabilise the security situation and to provide people with public services. We must reunite to resume the battle against the Iran-backed Houthis,“ the president said.

“I want the new government to hold the first meeting in Aden very soon so we can convey a message to our people and to the world that we will work hard to face the fallout from the war."

Nazar Haitham, spokesperson for the STC, told The National that the new government chaired by Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik is expected to go back to Aden in the next 10 days.

“They must reconstruct and reactivate the state institutions, in addition to reviving the dire economy and saving the local currency," he said.

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