World’s most advanced humanoid robot set to greet Museum of the Future visitors

Ameca has a human-like face and body and a sense of humour, manufacturer says

Ameca, the robot has a human-like face and body and has a sense of humour. Image: Museum of the Future
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Dubai's Museum of the Future has recruited a new member of staff to help visitors with their queries — an AI-powered humanoid robot.

Named Ameca, the robot has a human-like face and body and is capable of making facial expressions.

Ameca will interact with visitors to the Museum of the Future's Tomorrow Today exhibition, greeting them, giving directions and answering questions.

Ameca even has a sense of humour, according to its manufacturer, Engineered Arts, which describes it as the "world’s most advanced human-shaped robot".

The Tomorrow Today exhibition highlights solutions and concepts that demonstrate the application of advanced technology in the fields of renewable energy and sustainability.

It features more than 50 exhibits, including prototypes and current products focusing on five areas: waste management, environment, food security, agriculture and city planning.

The Museum of the Future was inaugurated by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai, in February.

The 77-metre-tall architectural marvel houses a series of interactive exhibitions that give visitors the chance to experience future technology and trends.

Spanning an area of 30,000 square metres, the pillarless structure has also been promoted as a novel global intellectual centre.

The stainless steel facade, which extends to more than 17,000 square metres, is illuminated by 14,000 metres of Arabic calligraphy designed by Mattar Bin Lahej, based on the poetry of Sheikh Mohammed about his vision for the city's future.

Translated into English, it says: "The future belongs to those who can imagine it, design it and execute it. It isn’t something you await, but rather create.”

Updated: October 09, 2022, 3:28 PM
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