Iata's interactive travel map shows which countries are open and where flights are operating

The map is updated every 15 minutes to show country-specific travel restrictions and flight rules

Keeping on top of the endless travel updates and changing movement restrictions across the globe during the pandemic is no easy task.

Regulations change daily, with countries making their own rules on whether flights can operate and who can cross borders.

To help make things a little clearer for anyone trying to plan travel, the International Air Transport Association has published a free interactive map that details what restrictions are in place and where.

Real-time updates

The map is updated every 15 minutes by a team working with 1,700 government sources across more than 220 countries. It relies on Iata's Timatic database, which contains information on documentation required for international travel. The information gives would-be travellers access to the most recent information on travel restrictions around the globe.

Travellers with holidays on the horizon can use the map to find out whether their trips are likely to go ahead. It’s also a handy way to see if flights are operating in and out of any country that people may be planning to visit in the coming months.

“As the aviation industry prepares to safely restart, travellers will need to know which countries’ borders are open and what health restrictions exist,” Anish Chand, assistant director on Iata's Timatic Team, said.

The user-friendly map is colour-coded according to the regulations in place in each country. Pale blue destinations are unrestricted, light blue countries have some restrictions and dark blue nations are totally restrictive.

The UAE is listed as “totally restricted”, as is neighbouring Oman and Saudi Arabia. Bahrain and Kuwait are listed as “partially restricted”.

Users can click on a country to reveal a pop-up information box that details the latest regulations for that location. Information pertaining to the UAE explains that most passenger flights are suspended. It also notes that repatriation flights and special services can operate in and out of the country, and that anyone landing in Dubai must complete a self-declaration health form.

Travellers can use the map to instantly see what’s required at any country in the world, and to check if they are currently eligible to visit specific destinations.

Iata says it has worked with airlines and government agencies across the world to present travellers with the most recent information but does not guarantee accuracy. Travellers are advised to use the map as a guide but should make their own checks before booking flights or planning travel.

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