Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 24 November 2020

'Beyond words': Watch as the northern lights dance across Norwegian night sky

Video taken of the natural phenomena plays out like a time-lapse, but is filmed in real time

Spectacular footage of the glowing northern lights has been caught on video as they move across the night sky.

The video taken of the natural phenomena plays out like a time-lapse, but is filmed in real time.

In the video, the person shooting the striking overhead scenes of the aurora borealis describes them as "beyond words."

What are the northern lights?

The northern lights are an astronomical phenomena and the result of charged particles from the Sun colliding with gaseous particles in the Earth’s atmosphere.

The swirling colour blocks that we fawn over come from the atoms being energised as they collide with the atmosphere and are affected by lines of magnetic force.

When is the best time to see the northern lights?

Peak season for the northern lights in Norway is in winter, typically from November until March. That's because the nights are longest during these months.

However, a visit to the Scandinavian country anytime between September and March can be a good time to spot the lights so long as it is a clear night. As with these months, the Arctic Circle's midnight Sun renders it almost impossible to see the lights.

The natural wonder is also easier to spot the further north you travel. In Norway, for the best chances of seeing the northern lights you have to go at least as far north as Bodo. Venturing to Tromso or Alta increases your chances further still.

Where else can I see them?

The Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) is seen over the sky near Rovaniemi in Lapland, Finland September 25, 2020.  REUTERS/Alexander Kuznetsov 
The aurora borealis (northern lights) is seen over the sky near Rovaniemi in Lapland, Finland September 25, 2020. Reuters

Outside of Norway, the northern lights are visible to the naked eye from several other countries. Some of the best spots to travel to see the aurora borealis include Finland, Sweden, Alaska, Canada, Russia, Scotland, Greenland and Denmark.

Iceland is a particularly good spot, as it is one of the only countries where you can see the lights from almost anywhere outside the capital city.

Updated: October 5, 2020 08:37 PM

Editor's Picks
THE DAILY NEWSLETTER
Sign up to our daily email