Al Bon: 'hidden gems' of Arab design now available on new online store

The new digital marketplace sells lifestyle objects from artisans in Saudi Arabia and beyond

A new digital marketplace from Saudi Arabia launched this week, selling handmade products by designers across the region.

Al Bon, which comes from “the gap between two objects” in Arabic, “gives design enthusiasts the opportunity to discover curated and selected creations directly from the hands of some of the most desired producers and designers”, according to a release.

Take a look through the photo gallery above to see more of what’s available on Al Bon.

Furniture, artworks, fashion items and gifts are among the selection available to buy now, with more products being added every day.

From a hand-painted dessert plate featuring miniature Islamic art by artist Noura Bouzo for Dh246 ($66) to a handmade walnut wood chair with mother-of-pearl inlay by the UAE's Are Gallery for Dh26,813, there’s something to suit every budget. Retail prices start from $40 and stretch to $9,000.

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We hand select every piece with the hope that shoppers enjoy not only the beauty of each item, but also discover something new about this enchanting part of the world
Al Bon

“Al Bon was created to help preserve Arab craftsmanship and highlight the diverse talent in our community,” reads a statement. “By bringing attention to the region’s craft traditions and heritage, our goal is that the Al Bon marketplace will make it easier for customers to find these independent brands and to discover the stories behind each artist and designer.

"We hand select every piece with the hope that shoppers enjoy not only the beauty of each item, but also discover something new about this enchanting part of the world.”

As well as Saudi Arabia, artisans from across the Mena region are involved, with designers hailing from Bahrain, Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, Morocco, Syria and the UAE.

This includes trays, cushions and baskets by home style consultant and decorator Rand Alkishtaini in Bahrain. There's also artwork featuring traditional weaving techniques by Abeer Alkhalifah from Saudi Arabia, who is inspired by her grandparents' heritage. Then there are the Cubist and Surrealist pieces by self-taught Jeddah artist Faisal Abdulaziz AlKheriji, aka Art by Faisal.

Shoppers can also pick up pieces by non-profit Inaash, such as keffiyeh scarves, hand-embroidered canvas clutches and beaded shawls. The organisation is dedicated to improving the lives of women in the Palestinian refugee camps of Lebanon by providing opportunities to earn income through their embroidered items.

Updated: August 4th 2021, 10:26 AM
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