Investors' darling in region

Egypt has been a prime destination for foreign investment in the Middle East.

Emaar Misr, a subsidiary of Emaar Properties, has four major projects in Cairo.
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With the Arab world's largest population and a central place in regional culture and commerce, Egypt has been a prime destination for foreign investment in the Middle East.
Economic reforms, a blossoming consumer base and big development projects have attracted major investments.
Regular government debt auctions, briskly traded stocks and solid economic growth also helped the case for investing in Egypt.
Even the more conservative global funds were moving in. Morgan Stanley's US$4 billion (Dh14.69bn) infrastructure fund last year signed a deal with Orascom Construction Industries to invest in projects in the country and wider region.
Emaar Misr, a subsidiary of Dubai's Emaar Properties, has four major projects in Cairo - Uptown Cairo, Marassi, Mivida and Cairo Gate.
Sorouh Egypt for Investment and Touristic Development, a subsidiary of Abu Dhabi's Sorouh Real Estate, is behind Sorouh City, a 500-hectare mixed-use development in New Cairo.
And Damac Properties of Dubai is developing Hyde Park, Park Avenue and Centre Ville, all in New Cairo, and Gamsha Bay on the Red Sea.
Buyout companies from the UAE have also planted deep roots in Egypt. Dubai Capital Group, part of Dubai Holding, owns 9.25 per cent of Commercial International Bank in Egypt, according to regulatory filings.
Dubai's Abraaj Capital owns 6.17 per cent of Orascom Construction, according to exchange records.
Emirates International Investment owns 8.75 per cent of Egypt's Citadel Capital, a regional private equity player. Saudi Arabia's Amwal AlKhaleej also has interests in Egypt.
Sultan al Mansouri, the UAE Minister of Economy, said in December that UAE investments in Egypt totalled about $10bn.
 
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