A family photo shows Munazza and Aqeel Malik with their daughter, Imanae, 3, who died after a lethal injection at a Lahore hospital.
A family photo shows Munazza and Aqeel Malik with their daughter, Imanae, 3, who died after a lethal injection at a Lahore hospital.

Toddler's death provokes outrage in Pakistan



LAHORE // Aqeel Malik, 29, had big plans for his daughter, Imanae. He wanted her to become an artist or a sculptor. He wanted her to study at Oxford University or Cambridge. He wanted his only child to always live close by. "She was a brilliant kid," he said, recalling how she could easily work laptops, iPods and the internet, even at the age of three.

But Imanae's life was cut short when in November, a day after Eid, the toddler was rushed to one of Lahore's most prestigious private hospitals with burns to her wrist and given a fatal dose of anaesthesia. An inquiry ordered by the provincial Punjab government found that Imanae was given two intravenous injections of a sedative and one injection of an anaesthetic, which according to medical protocol is never administered for minor burns. The anaesthetic, since it was given without respiratory support, killed her immediately.

The report blamed the hospital for the girl's death, and recommended closing it down as it lacked the basic human resources and equipment required for functioning. It also recommended a case of manslaughter be registered against the managing director of the hospital. A Supreme Court bench is expected to hear the case this month. Imanae's death spurred the Maliks into action. In an unprecedented move, the family conducted press conference after press conference giving the media details of how Imanae was treated at the hospital.

Overnight huge billboards with Imanae's photograph and the words "I died because of criminal negligence" were put at major junctions all over the city. Bumper stickers showing the little girl staring innocently into the camera were plastered across Lahore. And hundreds of people turned up for candlelit vigils. It is not the first time that a case of medical misconduct has been filed against a private hospital in Pakistan, but it is the first time the public has become so galvanised, in part because of the campaign by the Maliks but also because of frustration at the creeping decline of the country's health service.

Prof Javed Akram, principal of Jinnah Hospital - a government-run institute in Lahore - said part of the problem is that many doctors preferred to work overseas, in part because of the current instability in the country. "The healthcare system of Pakistan is falling apart because a large percentage of doctors who graduate from medical hospitals here go abroad, most of them never to return," he said.

"The insecurity in Pakistan is pushing away hundreds and thousands of qualified medical professionals." Asked to estimate, Prof Akram said more than 50 per cent of the graduating class from the college he heads applies for fellowships abroad. He also said Pakistan's government was entirely focused on fighting terrorism, leaving little time for dealing with other issues. For Mr Malik, the aim of his campaign was not only to have the doctors who administered the fatal shot suspended and the hospital shut down, but to force the government to set up a regulator to oversee private hospitals.

Currently, there are no laws governing the establishment of private health care facilities in Pakistan: almost anyone can set up a hospital, anywhere they want to. Dr Ahmad Nadeem, a registrar of the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council, agreed that terrorism and its related challenges was one reason for the health care system faltering in Pakistan. "The government is completely engrossed in dealing with security issues," he said. "Legislative work in all areas, including health, has come to a standstill and to date there is no legislation in the Punjab province which is regulating a private hospital set-up."

Health professional organisations have also been calling for increased spending on health. Currently, the country is spending US$4 (Dh15) per capita on health every year while the minimum requirement is $34 per capita in order to ensure adequate provision of health services. One reason for the decreased spending is that the giant share of Pakistan's budget is spent on defence, which results in inadequate facilities at public hospitals.

Dr Nadeem said one of the reasons for the growth in private hospitals was that there was "simply not enough hospitals to cope with the growing demands of an exploding population". After Imanae's death, the chief minister of Punjab province has pushed for a health care bill which would include regulation of private hospitals. During his struggle to obtain justice for his only daughter, Mr Malik said he received "tremendous support and encouragement from the general public".

In less than a month, he says, he has received more than 5,000 e-mails from the public, including 250 from people who were also victims of botched health care. Mr Malik said he had been offered a "hefty sum" by the hospital to drop the case, but he has refused, saying all he cares about is justice for his daughter. "I don't need money, I don't need recognition and I don't need appeasement," he said. "I simply want justice - justice for Imanae."

* The National

Day 2, Dubai Test: At a glance

Moment of the day Pakistan’s effort in the field had hints of shambles about it. The wheels were officially off when Wahab Riaz lost his run up and aborted the delivery four times in a row. He re-measured his run, jogged in for two practice goes. Then, when he was finally ready to go, he bailed out again. It was a total cringefest.

Stat of the day – 139.5 Yasir Shah has bowled 139.5 overs in three innings so far in this Test series. Judged by his returns, the workload has not withered him. He has 14 wickets so far, and became history’s first spinner to take five-wickets in an innings in five consecutive Tests. Not bad for someone whose fitness was in question before the series.

The verdict Stranger things have happened, but it is going to take something extraordinary for Pakistan to keep their undefeated record in Test series in the UAE in tact from this position. At least Shan Masood and Sami Aslam have made a positive start to the salvage effort.

Dengue fever symptoms

High fever (40°C/104°F)
Severe headache
Pain behind the eyes
Muscle and joint pains
Nausea
Vomiting
Swollen glands
Rash

The burning issue

The internal combustion engine is facing a watershed moment – major manufacturer Volvo is to stop producing petroleum-powered vehicles by 2021 and countries in Europe, including the UK, have vowed to ban their sale before 2040. The National takes a look at the story of one of the most successful technologies of the last 100 years and how it has impacted life in the UAE.

Part three: an affection for classic cars lives on

Read part two: how climate change drove the race for an alternative 

Read part one: how cars came to the UAE

The specs

Engine: 4-cylinder 2.0L TSI
Transmission: Dual clutch 7-speed
Power: 320HP / 235kW
Torque: 400Nm
Price: from $49,709
On sale: now

COMPANY PROFILE

Company name: Klipit

Started: 2022

Founders: Venkat Reddy, Mohammed Al Bulooki, Bilal Merchant, Asif Ahmed, Ovais Merchant

Based: Dubai, UAE

Industry: Digital receipts, finance, blockchain

Funding: $4 million

Investors: Privately/self-funded

In-demand jobs and monthly salaries
  • Technology expert in robotics and automation: Dh20,000 to Dh40,000 
  • Energy engineer: Dh25,000 to Dh30,000 
  • Production engineer: Dh30,000 to Dh40,000 
  • Data-driven supply chain management professional: Dh30,000 to Dh50,000 
  • HR leader: Dh40,000 to Dh60,000 
  • Engineering leader: Dh30,000 to Dh55,000 
  • Project manager: Dh55,000 to Dh65,000 
  • Senior reservoir engineer: Dh40,000 to Dh55,000 
  • Senior drilling engineer: Dh38,000 to Dh46,000 
  • Senior process engineer: Dh28,000 to Dh38,000 
  • Senior maintenance engineer: Dh22,000 to Dh34,000 
  • Field engineer: Dh6,500 to Dh7,500
  • Field supervisor: Dh9,000 to Dh12,000
  • Field operator: Dh5,000 to Dh7,000
Sarfira

Director: Sudha Kongara Prasad

Starring: Akshay Kumar, Radhika Madan, Paresh Rawal

Rating: 2/5

Know your cyber adversaries

Cryptojacking: Compromises a device or network to mine cryptocurrencies without an organisation's knowledge.

Distributed denial-of-service: Floods systems, servers or networks with information, effectively blocking them.

Man-in-the-middle attack: Intercepts two-way communication to obtain information, spy on participants or alter the outcome.

Malware: Installs itself in a network when a user clicks on a compromised link or email attachment.

Phishing: Aims to secure personal information, such as passwords and credit card numbers.

Ransomware: Encrypts user data, denying access and demands a payment to decrypt it.

Spyware: Collects information without the user's knowledge, which is then passed on to bad actors.

Trojans: Create a backdoor into systems, which becomes a point of entry for an attack.

Viruses: Infect applications in a system and replicate themselves as they go, just like their biological counterparts.

Worms: Send copies of themselves to other users or contacts. They don't attack the system, but they overload it.

Zero-day exploit: Exploits a vulnerability in software before a fix is found.

The Specs

Engine: 1.6-litre 4-cylinder petrol
Power: 118hp
Torque: 149Nm
Transmission: Six-speed automatic
Price: From Dh61,500
On sale: Now

About Tenderd

Started: May 2018

Founder: Arjun Mohan

Based: Dubai

Size: 23 employees 

Funding: Raised $5.8m in a seed fund round in December 2018. Backers include Y Combinator, Beco Capital, Venturesouq, Paul Graham, Peter Thiel, Paul Buchheit, Justin Mateen, Matt Mickiewicz, SOMA, Dynamo and Global Founders Capital

Batti Gul Meter Chalu

Producers: KRTI Productions, T-Series
Director: Sree Narayan Singh
Cast: Shahid Kapoor, Shraddha Kapoor, Divyenndu Sharma, Yami Gautam
Rating: 2/5

'The worst thing you can eat'

Trans fat is typically found in fried and baked goods, but you may be consuming more than you think.

Powdered coffee creamer, microwave popcorn and virtually anything processed with a crust is likely to contain it, as this guide from Mayo Clinic outlines: 

Baked goods - Most cakes, cookies, pie crusts and crackers contain shortening, which is usually made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. Ready-made frosting is another source of trans fat.

Snacks - Potato, corn and tortilla chips often contain trans fat. And while popcorn can be a healthy snack, many types of packaged or microwave popcorn use trans fat to help cook or flavour the popcorn.

Fried food - Foods that require deep frying — french fries, doughnuts and fried chicken — can contain trans fat from the oil used in the cooking process.

Refrigerator dough - Products such as canned biscuits and cinnamon rolls often contain trans fat, as do frozen pizza crusts.

Creamer and margarine - Nondairy coffee creamer and stick margarines also may contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oils.

How champions are made

Diet
7am - Protein shake with oats and fruits
10am - 5-6 egg whites
1pm - White rice or chapati (Indian bread) with chicken
4pm - Dry fruits
7.30pm - Pre workout meal – grilled fish or chicken with veggies and fruits
8.30pm to midnight workout
12.30am – Protein shake
Total intake: 4000-4500 calories
Saidu’s weight: 110 kg
Stats: Biceps 19 inches. Forearms 18 inches

MATCH INFO

Euro 2020 qualifier

Croatia v Hungary, Thursday, 10.45pm, UAE

TV: Match on BeIN Sports

Company Profile

Name: Raha
Started: 2022
Based: Kuwait/Saudi
Industry: Tech Logistics
Funding: $14 million
Investors: Soor Capital, eWTP Arabia Capital, Aujan Enterprises, Nox Management, Cedar Mundi Ventures
Number of employees: 166

Some of Darwish's last words

"They see their tomorrows slipping out of their reach. And though it seems to them that everything outside this reality is heaven, yet they do not want to go to that heaven. They stay, because they are afflicted with hope." - Mahmoud Darwish, to attendees of the Palestine Festival of Literature, 2008

His life in brief: Born in a village near Galilee, he lived in exile for most of his life and started writing poetry after high school. He was arrested several times by Israel for what were deemed to be inciteful poems. Most of his work focused on the love and yearning for his homeland, and he was regarded the Palestinian poet of resistance. Over the course of his life, he published more than 30 poetry collections and books of prose, with his work translated into more than 20 languages. Many of his poems were set to music by Arab composers, most significantly Marcel Khalife. Darwish died on August 9, 2008 after undergoing heart surgery in the United States. He was later buried in Ramallah where a shrine was erected in his honour.

Company Profile

Name: HyveGeo
Started: 2023
Founders: Abdulaziz bin Redha, Dr Samsurin Welch, Eva Morales and Dr Harjit Singh
Based: Cambridge and Dubai
Number of employees: 8
Industry: Sustainability & Environment
Funding: $200,000 plus undisclosed grant
Investors: Venture capital and government

Company profile

Company name: Fasset
Started: 2019
Founders: Mohammad Raafi Hossain, Daniel Ahmed
Based: Dubai
Sector: FinTech
Initial investment: $2.45 million
Current number of staff: 86
Investment stage: Pre-series B
Investors: Investcorp, Liberty City Ventures, Fatima Gobi Ventures, Primal Capital, Wealthwell Ventures, FHS Capital, VN2 Capital, local family offices

Profile of RentSher

Started: October 2015 in India, November 2016 in UAE

Founders: Harsh Dhand; Vaibhav and Purvashi Doshi

Based: Bangalore, India and Dubai, UAE

Sector: Online rental marketplace

Size: 40 employees

Investment: $2 million

PFA Premier League team of 2018-19

Allison (Liverpool)

Trent Alexander-Arnold (Liverpool)

Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool)

Aymeric Laporte (Manchester City)

Andrew Robertson (Liverpool)

Paul Pogba (Manchester United)

Fernandinho (Manchester City)

Bernardo Silva (Manchester City)

Raheem Sterling (Manchester City)

Sergio Aguero (Manchester City)

Sadio Mane (Liverpool)

If you go

The flights
There are various ways of getting to the southern Serengeti in Tanzania from the UAE. The exact route and airstrip depends on your overall trip itinerary and which camp you’re staying at. 
Flydubai flies direct from Dubai to Kilimanjaro International Airport from Dh1,350 return, including taxes; this can be followed by a short flight from Kilimanjaro to the Serengeti with Coastal Aviation from about US$700 (Dh2,500) return, including taxes. Kenya Airways, Emirates and Etihad offer flights via Nairobi or Dar es Salaam.   


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