Chemistry students do lab work at the Indian High School.
Chemistry students do lab work at the Indian High School.

'We do not compromise on education'



DUBAI // As Ashok Kumar, the chief executive of the Indian High School, walked into his school's well-stocked library, a big, brightly painted room filled with English and Hindi books and more than a dozen computers, he beamed with pride. "Even the best schools charging Dh40,000 or Dh50,000 will not have such facilities," he said.

"Each classroom has a smartboard," he added. "What school will have that?" The Indian High School is among those that Dubai's Knowledge and Human Development Authority classifies as good. By Mr Kumar's account, the school, a not-for-profit institution that opened its doors in 1961, offers a higher quality education than for-profit schools while charging lower fees: tuition starts at Dh3,500 (US$950) annually for KG1 and goes up to Dh5,500 for Grade 12.

"Charging low fees does not stop us from offering state-of-the-art education," Mr Kumar says. "Since it is not for profit and we have a model where people give time to the students, everything we do in the school is for the students. That's why we're able to keep low fees. We do not compromise on education." Inside the sprawling collection of buildings that make up the school - on a big grassy plot in Oud Metha - there is a certain feeling of community. Unlike many other Indian schools in its price range, the Indian High School is meticulously maintained: the grounds of the campus are kept clean, science labs are spacious and modern, and the school even boasts its own radio station.

"It's a good education. It's not just a low bracket," Mr Kumar said, adding that even parents who can afford more expensive schools enrol their children. Mr Kumar said Dubai needed more schools like his that operate on a not-for-profit basis. "It's a simple rule," he said. "If I were for-profit, I would be charging more. But in the same fee bracket, nobody has such facilities. We have better facilities than the people on a higher bracket."

"It's not-for-profit, anything which we make is ploughed back in the system," Mr Kumar said. "We have a lot of honorary advisers and workers on the board who don't charge. So if I hired a consultant on safety they would charge me a bomb, but I have an honorary consultant who does it for free, so we save on that." But the waiting list for the Indian High School is 4,000 strong and students are selected by lottery. Most parents who want to send their children to the school are not able to obtain a place even though the school has close to 10,000 on its rolls between the two campuses.

"The facilities offered by the school are high, especially since the fees are pretty low," said Steve Thomas, a 16-year-old student who has been at the Indian High School since kindergarten. "We had board exams in another school last year," he said. "The facilities here are much better. If you compare the ACs and stuff they are much better. "In the lower grades they have projector screens and laptops are provided to each in the classrooms ... The classrooms are also much bigger and better."

klewis@thenational.ae

THE SPECS

Engine: 1.5-litre

Transmission: 6-speed automatic

Power: 110 horsepower

Torque: 147Nm

Price: From Dh59,700

On sale: now

The years Ramadan fell in May

1987

1954

1921

1888

While you're here
BLACKBERRY

Director: Matt Johnson

Stars: Jay Baruchel, Glenn Howerton, Matt Johnson

Rating: 4/5

Company Profile

Company name: Hoopla
Date started: March 2023
Founder: Jacqueline Perrottet
Based: Dubai
Number of staff: 10
Investment stage: Pre-seed
Investment required: $500,000

The specs

Engine: 1.5-litre 4-cylinder
Transmission: CVT
Power: 119bhp
Torque: 145Nm
Price: Dh,89,900 ($24,230)
On sale: now

MADAME WEB

Director: S.J. Clarkson

Starring: Dakota Johnson, Tahar Rahim, Sydney Sweeney

Rating: 3.5/5

ROUTE TO TITLE

Round 1: Beat Leolia Jeanjean 6-1, 6-2
Round 2: Beat Naomi Osaka 7-6, 1-6, 7-5
Round 3: Beat Marie Bouzkova 6-4, 6-2
Round 4: Beat Anastasia Potapova 6-0, 6-0
Quarter-final: Beat Marketa Vondrousova 6-0, 6-2
Semi-final: Beat Coco Gauff 6-2, 6-4
Final: Beat Jasmine Paolini 6-2, 6-2

The specs

Engine: 3.9-litre twin-turbo V8
Power: 620hp from 5,750-7,500rpm
Torque: 760Nm from 3,000-5,750rpm
Transmission: Eight-speed dual-clutch auto
On sale: Now
Price: From Dh1.05 million ($286,000)

Specs

Power train: 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 and synchronous electric motor
Max power: 800hp
Max torque: 950Nm
Transmission: Eight-speed auto
Battery: 25.7kWh lithium-ion
0-100km/h: 3.4sec
0-200km/h: 11.4sec
Top speed: 312km/h
Max electric-only range: 60km (claimed)
On sale: Q3
Price: From Dh1.2m (estimate)

RACE CARD

5pm: Wathba Stallions Cup – Handicap (PA) Dh70,000 (Turf) 2,200m
5.30pm: Khor Al Baghal – Conditions (PA) Dh80,000 (T) 1,600m
6pm: Khor Faridah – Handicap (PA) Dh80,000 (T) 1,600m
6.30pm: Abu Dhabi Fillies Classic – Prestige (PA) Dh110,000 (T) 1,400m
7pm: Abu Dhabi Colts Classic – Prestige (PA) Dh110,000 (T) 1,400m
7.30pm: Khor Laffam – Handicap (TB) Dh80,000 (T) 2,200m

Honeymoonish

Director: Elie El Samaan

Starring: Nour Al Ghandour, Mahmoud Boushahri

Rating: 3/5

The burning issue

The internal combustion engine is facing a watershed moment – major manufacturer Volvo is to stop producing petroleum-powered vehicles by 2021 and countries in Europe, including the UK, have vowed to ban their sale before 2040. The National takes a look at the story of one of the most successful technologies of the last 100 years and how it has impacted life in the UAE.

Part three: an affection for classic cars lives on

Read part two: how climate change drove the race for an alternative 

Read part one: how cars came to the UAE

COMPANY PROFILE

Company name: Silkhaus

Started: 2021

Founders: Aahan Bhojani and Ashmin Varma

Based: Dubai, UAE

Industry: Property technology

Funding: $7.75 million

Investors: Nuwa Capital, VentureSouq, Nordstar, Global Founders Capital, Yuj Ventures and Whiteboard Capital


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