Young girl with blood condition has wish come true with Dubai day out

Hour Mohammed Ali Al Naqbi, a six-year-old Emirati from Khor Fakkan, suffers from sickle cell anaemia and Make-A-Wish Foundation made it possible for her to get a family day out in Dubai.
Hour Al Naqbi, six, smiles, delighted to meet Ski Dubai’s penguins. The visit was organised by Make-A-Wish Foundation UAE. Courtesy Ski Dubai
Hour Al Naqbi, six, smiles, delighted to meet Ski Dubai’s penguins. The visit was organised by Make-A-Wish Foundation UAE. Courtesy Ski Dubai

DUBAI // Hour Al Naqbi desperately wanted to meet Ski Dubai’s penguins. When she met the waddling celebrities, her little face broke into a big smile.

The six-year-old Emirati girl from Khor Fakkan has sickle-cell anaemia, a life-threatening illness. So, when Hour’s dreams came true, thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the American School Dubai (ASD), she was thrilled.

“She had a blast. She loved it so much that she asked me if they can do it again. It was one joyous day that will be remembered forever,” said her father, Mohamed Al Naqbi.

“There was a band playing music for us when we arrived, then she went after the warm welcome to play in Kidzania with other kids.”

The foundation heard about Hour’s plight while she was at hospital in Fujairah. Mr Al Naqbi said his daughter also needed monthly treatment at Sheikh Khalifa Medical City in Abu Dhabi. “From time to time she gets severe pain in her joints and back pain but we hope she gets better with time,” he said.

The foundation worked with ASD to organise the day out on Friday last week.

“Hour told us that she wanted to have a fun day at Kidzania and meet the penguins at Ski Dubai,” said Anu Das, manager of the Make-A-Wish Foundation in Dubai. “ASD has a club called Kids for Wish Kids, which is made up of pupils who arrange these events.”

Hour, her parents and sister Meera, three, were collected at home by limousine and taken to the Mall of the Emirates.

Sickle-cell anaemia is an inherited disorder of red blood cells – of the haemoglobin in the cells that carry oxygen. Cells affected by sickle-cell anaemia can block blood vessels, resulting in tissue and organ damage – and severe pain.

The condition is treated with a mixture of lifestyle changes, such as drinking plenty of fluids, pain relief and medication.

nhanif@thenational.ae

Published: May 18, 2015 04:00 AM

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